Gotenyama House

The Gotenyama Forest

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Gotenyama, exclusive urban residences bringing Japan and the world closer.

Gotenyama, exclusive urban residences bringing Japan and the world closer.

Development area

With its eye on 2020, Tokyo is accelerating the pace of urban renewal, aiming to become a truly global city. Shinagawa is playing an increasingly significant role in that drive forward. Soon, Shinagawa will be the center of new, more powerful options for accessing destinations both domestic and foreign, its function as a hub greatly enhanced through major urban redevelopment projects. And yet, in the heart of this dramatically evolving city lies an exclusive residential district offering an unchanging sense of repose. That place is Gotenyama. A prestigious perch since the Edo Period, this location atop the Takanawadai rise is a Category 1 low-rise exclusive residential district, a designation covering just 4.8%*1 of the total area of Tokyo’s six central wards, and a peaceful environment also home to embassies and museums. With all its gifts as a residential district, Gotenyama also offers proximity to major transportation and the rare opportunity to live in a place with a rich future. A residence that encompasses such value could only be Gotenyama House.
*1 Of the approximate total area of 8,600 ha encompassing Chiyoda, Chuo, Minato, Shinjuku, Bunkyo and Shibuya wards, land designated a Category 1 low-rise exclusive residential district represents only about 410 ha (calculation based on statistical records on the website of the Council on Special Zones).

Site conceptual diagram
Site conceptual diagram *Surrounding buildings have been omitted.Building heights, locations, distances, orientations and depths not actually as shown.

From famed cherry blossoms, to forested enclave.

Shinagawa was the first post town on the Tokaido route from Edo to Kyoto, and in the Edo Period was known as Shinagawa Minato, the entrance to Edo proper. On a hill overlooking the Shinagawa post town, shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu built the Shinagawa Goten, a palace where he could go to personally entertain feudal lords arriving from throughout Japan for their mandatory bi-annual residence in Edo. This is the origin of the name “Gotenyama.” Later, Yoshino cherry trees were planted around Gotenyama, and the area was gradually transformed into a popular spot for outings among the ordinary citizens of Edo, known for its scenic beauty. During the Edo Period, Gotenyama was lined with spacious samurai residences, but by the Meiji Period, they had mostly been taken over by the politicians and financiers responsible for Japan’s modernization, who realized the value of the location close to the city’s center, the stability of the hill’s bedrock and its convenience as a transportation hub.
“Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji: Mt. Fuji from Gotenyama Hill in Shinagawa on the Tokaido” by Katsushika Hokusai (1832)
“Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji: Mt. Fuji from Gotenyama Hill in Shinagawa
on the Tokaido” by Katsushika Hokusai (1832)

Magnificent space, with the pedigree of Meiji-era mansions.

  • A grand swath of green, stretching from Kaitokaku, to Gotenyama Trust City, to Gotenyama House. The scenery tempts one to call this magnificent Meiji-era estate the Gotenyama Forest; in fact, it has been passed down until today as a single collection of properties. In the past, these were private estates: Kaitokaku belonged to Iwasaki Hisaya of the Mitsubishi conglomerate; the site of the present Gotenyama Trust City was the residence of banker Hara Rokuro; and where Gotenyama House stands today stood the home of Masuda Takashi, head of the Mitsui conglomerate. Masuda Takashi, having hired Josiah Conder, who had designed the Rokumeikan, is said to have spent lavishly on the construction of his mansion. Stemming from its place as a status symbol among the great industrialists, Gotenyama thus established an unassailable position as a district of the most exclusive homes.
  • Gotenyama in 1933,the Iwasaki, Hara and Masuda residences all in a row (From “Complete Map of Shinagawa Ward,” Uchiyama Mokei Seizusha).

    Gotenyama in 1933, the Iwasaki, Hara and Masuda residences all in a row
    (From “Complete Map of Shinagawa Ward,” Uchiyama Mokei Seizusha).

  • Aerial photograph (taken November, 2014) ※Aerial photograph has been digitally altered and may differ from actual view.

    Aerial photograph (taken November, 2014)
    ※Aerial photograph has been digitally altered and may differ from actual view.

A beautiful, green residential environment, set off from the surrounding neighborhood.

Leafy shade and an all-encompassing tranquility envelope elegant embassies, private homes and streets. Here, people exude a certain pride in their neighborhood. Gotenyama, located at the top of the Takanawadai rise, is a tranquil residential environment designated a Category 1 low-rise exclusive residential district, rare within the boundaries of the Yamanote Line. There await any number of lavish lifestyles. The Tokyo Marriot Hotel is close enough to use as one’s own dining room and lounge. If one is so inclined, cutting-edge modern art is available at the Hara Museum of Contemporary art. Michelin three-star restaurants and other gourmet delights abound.This is a town that will fill your heart with delight.

Area Map

Gotenyama Trust City (approx. 160 m/a two-minute walk) Surrounding streets (Yatsuyama-dori) (approx. 520 m/a seven-minute walk) Tokyo Marriot Hotel/Gotenyama Trust Court (approx. 200 m/a three-minute walk)

Autumn colors at Gotenyama Trust City (approx. 160 m/two-minute walk)

*Photos taken in June and December, 2014.